W.A.A.C Founded 100th Anniversary Thimble

£7.95
By 1917, the Army was running short of men because so many had been injured or killed on the front line. The War Office had also identified that a number of jobs, which did not involve fighting, were being carried out by men who could have been in battle. It was decided that women could do many of these jobs instead and that they could replace male soldiers in offices, canteens, transport roles, stores and army bases. Many women volunteered to join the new Women's Army Auxiliary Corps. By the end of the war in 1918, more than 50,000 women had joined the WAAC, some working in war zones in France, Belgium, Italy and Greece. The WAAC was disbanded in 1978 and all units were integrated with male units.

Product Code: T136481

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Product Description

By 1917, the Army was running short of men because so many had been injured or killed on the front line. The War Office had also identified that a number of jobs, which did not involve fighting, were being carried out by men who could have been in battle. It was decided that women could do many of these jobs instead and that they could replace male soldiers in offices, canteens, transport roles, stores and army bases. Many women volunteered to join the new Women's Army Auxiliary Corps. By the end of the war in 1918, more than 50,000 women had joined the WAAC, some working in war zones in France, Belgium, Italy and Greece. The WAAC was disbanded in 1978 and all units were integrated with male units.